There is so much interest nowadays on indigenous knowledge systems. Researchers are curious what may be useful to meet current challenges. Bioprospectors are hoping to make commercial value to their find. The subject of ethics is primary in this kind of study (a discourse on this:, while validation of the applicability of the practices may be constrained by the lack of holistic view and approach of researchers. When practices only include those that are in the realm of the 5 senses (or those in the material/physical), not much progress can be made. When practices beyond actual farming/gardening practices are included progress may be achieved, but  only if the science is expanded and include the non-material or spiritual science (e.g., that of anthroposophy of Rudolf Steiner).  To see indigenous or local practices in a better light, we need to consider what our world is made of beyond the physical, and what the role of consciousness is to make thoughts and intentions become real. Agriculture provides a rich material for the discussion. Quantum agriculture encompasses both material and non-material aspects. Below is an article that I wrote to expand the discussion on some fundamental subjects…

Is belief the only factor for the experience, or is there another science to this practice?

Indigenous Practices, Consciousness, and Ether 

To give some more grounding on Quantum Agriculture I write a little bit about some fundamental topics that are also really complex and can fill up an infinite number of pages.

Indigenous Practices

The indigenous and local peoples are much into “odd” or unusual practices, rituals and belief systems. Often the material scientists disregard the value of these practices, even if their application proves that they work and that they are shared by many cultures all over the world.

Most practices reside in the material science realm. Some are a mix of material and non-material. Here is a talk giving an example of indigenous practices that combine both:

(   Here also in my article in the early 1990’s about Indigenous seed related practices (which covers the whole production system) (


Beyond the usual practices are those that include simply doing nothing but simply imagining, believing, or thinking about an outcome. It may even be by just being present in the field or the garden. It is said that the more highly evolved the consciousness of the farmer or gardener is, the more effective is the practice. And improved consciousness may be achieved with cultivation, unless the person is already innately gifted with such capacities. Prayers, chants, offerings, and other forms of invocations are still rich among indigenous cultures. Other practices that accompany these could be dancing, chanting, using hand gestures and/or objects to represent a phenomenon, like hanging bottles on the vine for plants to imitate and bear fruit.


It is also common to use plants or other objects to achieve protection or have a healthy harvest (; The practice of letting crop seeds like maize go through the head of a snake (can just be the skull) so the subsequent crop may not be infested with rats is also common. Here it is believed that rats would sense the “presence” of a snake and such presence, which may be only what remains of it (also called the information or energy pattern), is imparted to and carried by the ritualized seed samples during the growing season. A perspective on snakes is given here:

Snakes also signify regeneration; they are an image of the synthesis of the generative power of the cosmos. On an even more practical, agrarian level, snakes predate upon many of the small animals that eat seeds and grain stores. This may be connected to Chicomecóatl in Her guise as the guardian of foodstuffs.  

Read more here.